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A late “fitness Friday” post!
1. Weighted toe touches: bring your hands to your toes, with or without a weight in your hands for added difficulty.
2. Side toe touches (be sure to do both sides, as one set): angle yourself so you are slightly on one hip, bring your toes to your hands, but twist your feet straight up once you reach the top.
3. Around the world: start at the bottom, swing your legs together, up and around your body, stopping and reversing once you reach the bottom again.
4. Weighted side taps (both sides as one set): raise yourself on one side, touch your hip to the ground and back up, add a weight for increased difficulty.
Do each exercise for one minute straight, no stopping, 3 sets through.

sublime-living:

Fastest RAW VEGAN zucchini “fettuccine” you ever had!
A twist on the classic fettuccine alfredo pasta recipe.  This dish is not only delicious, but completely raw vegan (aside from the topped Parmesan) and even without any cream, using organic tofu provides the same creamy goodness :)
5 large organic zucchini
1 (14 oz) package of organic tofu
5 cups of fresh organic spinach
1 tablespoon fresh oregano
1 tablespoon fresh basil
1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt
2 cloves garlic
- Using a vegetable peeler, skin the zucchini first, then  continue to “peel” the rest of the zucchini until you hit the seeds, making “Fettuccine” noodles.
- Combine tofu, spinach, garlic, oregano, basil, and salt in a processor, and blend until smooth. If the mixture needs a little help, add a bit of vegetable stock to smooth it out.
-  Plate some zucchini noodles and pour on the sauce. Grate some fresh Parmesan cheese over the top if you are not going vegan,
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 5
ISO
64
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
4mm

sublime-living:

Fastest RAW VEGAN zucchini “fettuccine” you ever had!

A twist on the classic fettuccine alfredo pasta recipe.  This dish is not only delicious, but completely raw vegan (aside from the topped Parmesan) and even without any cream, using organic tofu provides the same creamy goodness :)

  • 5 large organic zucchini
  • 1 (14 oz) package of organic tofu
  • 5 cups of fresh organic spinach
  • 1 tablespoon fresh oregano
  • 1 tablespoon fresh basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt
  • 2 cloves garlic

- Using a vegetable peeler, skin the zucchini first, then  continue to “peel” the rest of the zucchini until you hit the seeds, making “Fettuccine” noodles.

- Combine tofu, spinach, garlic, oregano, basil, and salt in a processor, and blend until smooth. If the mixture needs a little help, add a bit of vegetable stock to smooth it out.

-  Plate some zucchini noodles and pour on the sauce. Grate some fresh Parmesan cheese over the top if you are not going vegan,

Fastest RAW VEGAN zucchini “fettuccine” you ever had!
A twist on the classic fettuccine alfredo pasta recipe.  This dish is not only delicious, but completely raw vegan (aside from the topped Parmesan) and even without any cream, using organic tofu provides the same creamy goodness :)
5 large organic zucchini
1 (14 oz) package of organic tofu
5 cups of fresh organic spinach
1 tablespoon fresh oregano
1 tablespoon fresh basil
1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt
2 cloves garlic
- Using a vegetable peeler, skin the zucchini first, then  continue to “peel” the rest of the zucchini until you hit the seeds, making “Fettuccine” noodles.
- Combine tofu, spinach, garlic, oregano, basil, and salt in a processor, and blend until smooth. If the mixture needs a little help, add a bit of vegetable stock to smooth it out.
-  Plate some zucchini noodles and pour on the sauce. Grate some fresh Parmesan cheese over the top if you are not going vegan, you can also heat up the sauce if you prefer the dish hit instead of raw.
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 5
ISO
64
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
4mm

Fastest RAW VEGAN zucchini “fettuccine” you ever had!

A twist on the classic fettuccine alfredo pasta recipe. This dish is not only delicious, but completely raw vegan (aside from the topped Parmesan) and even without any cream, using organic tofu provides the same creamy goodness :)

  • 5 large organic zucchini
  • 1 (14 oz) package of organic tofu
  • 5 cups of fresh organic spinach
  • 1 tablespoon fresh oregano
  • 1 tablespoon fresh basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt
  • 2 cloves garlic

- Using a vegetable peeler, skin the zucchini first, then continue to “peel” the rest of the zucchini until you hit the seeds, making “Fettuccine” noodles.

- Combine tofu, spinach, garlic, oregano, basil, and salt in a processor, and blend until smooth. If the mixture needs a little help, add a bit of vegetable stock to smooth it out.

- Plate some zucchini noodles and pour on the sauce. Grate some fresh Parmesan cheese over the top if you are not going vegan, you can also heat up the sauce if you prefer the dish hit instead of raw.

Vegetarian Chili on Wild Rice
one chopped onion
6 garlic cloves, minced
12 medium organic tomatoes, diced
2 ears of organic corn
one medium organic sweet potato, diced
30 oz. of beans, cooked (if you are short on time 2 fifteen ounce cans of beans work, make sure you drain the liquid) we used half kidney and half pinto beans in our chili.
4 tablespoons chili powder
1 & 1/2 tablespoons cumin
2 teaspoons Himalayan salt
4 tablespoons vegetable stock plus 1/4 cup
1/4 cup homemade tomato paste

1. In a large pot, heat the 4 tablespoons of vegetable stock and add onions, garlic, and sweet potato.
2. Cook on medium high until the onions are soft.
3. Add the chili powder and cumin, stir together, then add the 1/4 cup of vegetable stock to incorporate everything together.  Let cook for about 5 minutes, stirring.
4. Add the corn, and beans and let it cook for 2 minutes.
5. Next add all the tomatoes and tomato paste and give the pot a good stir. Add the salt.
6. Turn the heat down to medium and let the chili simmer for 5-8 minutes.
7. Check the flavor, add more salt or chili powder/ cumin to your liking.
8. Remove from the heat and serve over a nice bowl of wild rice! 

Facts about BEANS:
- Beans are “nutritional powerhouses,” high in protein, (animal protein substitute) fiber, B vitamins, iron, and potassium, all while containing very low fat.
- Beans aid in weight loss, prevents heart disease, lowers cholesterol, and helps manage diabetes.
-Just remember as you eat more beans and legumes, be sure to drink more fluids throughout your day or the increase in fiber can cause some backup, eeek!
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 5
ISO
64
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/30th
Focal Length
4mm

Vegetarian Chili on Wild Rice

  • one chopped onion
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 12 medium organic tomatoes, diced
  • 2 ears of organic corn
  • one medium organic sweet potato, diced
  • 30 oz. of beans, cooked (if you are short on time 2 fifteen ounce cans of beans work, make sure you drain the liquid) we used half kidney and half pinto beans in our chili.
  • 4 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 & 1/2 tablespoons cumin
  • 2 teaspoons Himalayan salt
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable stock plus 1/4 cup
  • 1/4 cup homemade tomato paste

1. In a large pot, heat the 4 tablespoons of vegetable stock and add onions, garlic, and sweet potato.

2. Cook on medium high until the onions are soft.

3. Add the chili powder and cumin, stir together, then add the 1/4 cup of vegetable stock to incorporate everything together.  Let cook for about 5 minutes, stirring.

4. Add the corn, and beans and let it cook for 2 minutes.

5. Next add all the tomatoes and tomato paste and give the pot a good stir. Add the salt.

6. Turn the heat down to medium and let the chili simmer for 5-8 minutes.

7. Check the flavor, add more salt or chili powder/ cumin to your liking.

8. Remove from the heat and serve over a nice bowl of wild rice! 

Facts about BEANS:

- Beans are “nutritional powerhouses,” high in protein, (animal protein substitute) fiber, B vitamins, iron, and potassium, all while containing very low fat.

- Beans aid in weight loss, prevents heart disease, lowers cholesterol, and helps manage diabetes.

-Just remember as you eat more beans and legumes, be sure to drink more fluids throughout your day or the increase in fiber can cause some backup, eeek!

Makes 2 bowls of udon
Ingredients for Dashi (soup stock):
4 1/2 C water1/4 C loosely packed kezurikatsuo (shaved bonito fish flakes)3″ piece of dried dashi kombu (seaweed)
Ingredients for Abura-age (tofu slices):
1/4 C water15 niboshi (small dried fish)2 Tbs soy sauce1 Tbs mirin1 Tbs sugar4 squares of abura-age (thin deep fried tofu)
Ingredients for Soup:
200g dry udon or 300g fresh Udon4 C dashi2 Tbs soy sauce1 Tbs mirin2 tsp sugarsalt to taste2 scallions cut on the bias8 slices of carrot
Ingredients for Udon:
1 tsp Salt
2/3 Cup of Water
2 1/2 Cups Wheat flour

Method:
For the dashi, bring the water to a boil in a pot. Once it boils, turn the heat down to maintain a gentle simmer (boiling makes the stock cloudy). Put the kezurikatsuo into a disposable tea bag, or wrap it in cheese cloth and tie the top. Drop the satchel in the water along with the kombu if you are using it. You can also just put the kezurikatsuo straight into the water and strain it when the stock is done. Let this steep for about 15 minutes, then discard the tea bag, or strain the stock into another pot and discard the solids.
For the Abura-age. Add everything except the abura age into a small pot and bring to a boil. Once the sugar has dissolved, add the abura-age and simmer, flip several times until most of the liquid is absorbed and the abura-age is a deep brown color. Transfer from the pot to a small bowl and allow it to cool a bit. When it’s cool enough to handle, press out some of the excess liquid. You don’t want to squeeze all the liquid out, just enough to keep it from being salty.
For the Udon. Dissolve salt in water and add flour. Knead for 20 minutes thoroughly. Add a little water if dough is not working smoothly. It should be quite tough but smooth. Place in an airtight plastic bag and sit at room temperature for 1 hour. Knead for another 5 minutes and then place back in bag for another 30 minutes. Roll out dough to about 1/8 inch thick and dust with potato starch. Lift flattened dough by one end and slowly lay it down onto the table in an “accordion” looking way by letting the dough fold back and forth onto the bottom layer of the dough until it is all rested on top of itself. Slice individual noodles across the “accordion” to get a uniform cut and dust with starch again.
Boil a large pot of water and boil the udon until it rises. Make sure the noodles are al dente as they will be sitting in a bowl of hot broth and you don’t want them to go soggy before you’re done eating them. When they’re done, rinse them under cold water to stop the cooking.

To finish it all off, put the dashi, soy sauce, mirin and sugar into a pot and heat until it comes to a simmer. Taste it and add salt if you feel like it needs more. Add the noodles to heat through, then divide them into two bowls. Top with the seasoned abura-age, scallions and then pour the broth over everything. For a little extra color and kick, you can serve this with shichimi togarashi (Japanese 7 spice chili flakes).
Enjoy! 

Thanks for the help on the soup stock from Rasa Malaysia!
Zoom Info
Makes 2 bowls of udon
Ingredients for Dashi (soup stock):
4 1/2 C water1/4 C loosely packed kezurikatsuo (shaved bonito fish flakes)3″ piece of dried dashi kombu (seaweed)
Ingredients for Abura-age (tofu slices):
1/4 C water15 niboshi (small dried fish)2 Tbs soy sauce1 Tbs mirin1 Tbs sugar4 squares of abura-age (thin deep fried tofu)
Ingredients for Soup:
200g dry udon or 300g fresh Udon4 C dashi2 Tbs soy sauce1 Tbs mirin2 tsp sugarsalt to taste2 scallions cut on the bias8 slices of carrot
Ingredients for Udon:
1 tsp Salt
2/3 Cup of Water
2 1/2 Cups Wheat flour

Method:
For the dashi, bring the water to a boil in a pot. Once it boils, turn the heat down to maintain a gentle simmer (boiling makes the stock cloudy). Put the kezurikatsuo into a disposable tea bag, or wrap it in cheese cloth and tie the top. Drop the satchel in the water along with the kombu if you are using it. You can also just put the kezurikatsuo straight into the water and strain it when the stock is done. Let this steep for about 15 minutes, then discard the tea bag, or strain the stock into another pot and discard the solids.
For the Abura-age. Add everything except the abura age into a small pot and bring to a boil. Once the sugar has dissolved, add the abura-age and simmer, flip several times until most of the liquid is absorbed and the abura-age is a deep brown color. Transfer from the pot to a small bowl and allow it to cool a bit. When it’s cool enough to handle, press out some of the excess liquid. You don’t want to squeeze all the liquid out, just enough to keep it from being salty.
For the Udon. Dissolve salt in water and add flour. Knead for 20 minutes thoroughly. Add a little water if dough is not working smoothly. It should be quite tough but smooth. Place in an airtight plastic bag and sit at room temperature for 1 hour. Knead for another 5 minutes and then place back in bag for another 30 minutes. Roll out dough to about 1/8 inch thick and dust with potato starch. Lift flattened dough by one end and slowly lay it down onto the table in an “accordion” looking way by letting the dough fold back and forth onto the bottom layer of the dough until it is all rested on top of itself. Slice individual noodles across the “accordion” to get a uniform cut and dust with starch again.
Boil a large pot of water and boil the udon until it rises. Make sure the noodles are al dente as they will be sitting in a bowl of hot broth and you don’t want them to go soggy before you’re done eating them. When they’re done, rinse them under cold water to stop the cooking.

To finish it all off, put the dashi, soy sauce, mirin and sugar into a pot and heat until it comes to a simmer. Taste it and add salt if you feel like it needs more. Add the noodles to heat through, then divide them into two bowls. Top with the seasoned abura-age, scallions and then pour the broth over everything. For a little extra color and kick, you can serve this with shichimi togarashi (Japanese 7 spice chili flakes).
Enjoy! 

Thanks for the help on the soup stock from Rasa Malaysia!
Zoom Info

Makes 2 bowls of udon

Ingredients for Dashi (soup stock):

4 1/2 C water
1/4 C loosely packed kezurikatsuo (shaved bonito fish flakes)
3″ piece of dried dashi kombu (seaweed)

Ingredients for Abura-age (tofu slices):

1/4 C water
15 niboshi (small dried fish)
2 Tbs soy sauce
1 Tbs mirin
1 Tbs sugar
4 squares of abura-age (thin deep fried tofu)

Ingredients for Soup:

200g dry udon or 300g fresh Udon
4 C dashi
2 Tbs soy sauce
1 Tbs mirin
2 tsp sugar
salt to taste
2 scallions cut on the bias
8 slices of carrot

Ingredients for Udon:


1 tsp Salt

2/3 Cup of Water

2 1/2 Cups Wheat flour

Method:

For the dashi, bring the water to a boil in a pot. Once it boils, turn the heat down to maintain a gentle simmer (boiling makes the stock cloudy). Put the kezurikatsuo into a disposable tea bag, or wrap it in cheese cloth and tie the top. Drop the satchel in the water along with the kombu if you are using it. You can also just put the kezurikatsuo straight into the water and strain it when the stock is done. Let this steep for about 15 minutes, then discard the tea bag, or strain the stock into another pot and discard the solids.

For the Abura-age. Add everything except the abura age into a small pot and bring to a boil. Once the sugar has dissolved, add the abura-age and simmer, flip several times until most of the liquid is absorbed and the abura-age is a deep brown color. Transfer from the pot to a small bowl and allow it to cool a bit. When it’s cool enough to handle, press out some of the excess liquid. You don’t want to squeeze all the liquid out, just enough to keep it from being salty.

For the Udon. Dissolve salt in water and add flour. Knead for 20 minutes thoroughly. Add a little water if dough is not working smoothly. It should be quite tough but smooth. Place in an airtight plastic bag and sit at room temperature for 1 hour. Knead for another 5 minutes and then place back in bag for another 30 minutes. Roll out dough to about 1/8 inch thick and dust with potato starch. Lift flattened dough by one end and slowly lay it down onto the table in an “accordion” looking way by letting the dough fold back and forth onto the bottom layer of the dough until it is all rested on top of itself. Slice individual noodles across the “accordion” to get a uniform cut and dust with starch again.

Boil a large pot of water and boil the udon until it rises. Make sure the noodles are al dente as they will be sitting in a bowl of hot broth and you don’t want them to go soggy before you’re done eating them. When they’re done, rinse them under cold water to stop the cooking.

To finish it all off, put the dashi, soy sauce, mirin and sugar into a pot and heat until it comes to a simmer. Taste it and add salt if you feel like it needs more. Add the noodles to heat through, then divide them into two bowls. Top with the seasoned abura-age, scallions and then pour the broth over everything. For a little extra color and kick, you can serve this with shichimi togarashi (Japanese 7 spice chili flakes).

Enjoy! 

Thanks for the help on the soup stock from Rasa Malaysia!

Fitness Friday


Here are a few more workout tips to try!

Begin with our dynamic warm-up then go straight into a workout with the 4 exercises from the video above, combined with another 4 from previous posts.  Again, do each exercise for a minute straight, as many times as you can.  Repeat the cycle 3 times for a full workout.

  1. Single leg squat (do not let the raised leg touch the ground and focus on keeping your pelvis forward.)
  2. In and Out jump squats
  3. Plank ab twists (keep your shoulder square and really twist from your hips)
  4. Mountain climbers
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